Archives for January 2016

Twitter confirms it’s experimenting with native polls in tweets

Twitter typographic wallpaper

Twitter is looking at possibly letting users add quick polls to their tweets. A company spokesperson confirmed the move in a statement to VentureBeat saying, “We’re experimenting with a new way to poll users on Twitter.”

Right now, it looks like polls are only visible on Twitter’s mobile apps and website, but not on desktop applications like TweetDeck. There’s no indication of whether this capability will be rolled out to the rest of the 316 million monthly active users, as it’s an experiment that could wind up being shelved.

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This isn’t the first time that Twitter has rolled out polls on its communications service. Previously, companies were able to poll their followers through custom card polls. In 2014, Twitter revealed that it was testing out a feature that would enable native ads for publishers. Today’s sightings may hint that these could be rolled out to a wider audience.

From what we’ve seen, all polls have a 24-hour time limit on them.

While Twitter declined to provide more information, a quick query on the site showed that at least Twitter employees and also some verified profiles, including those in the media and in sports, have access to embed these polls.

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24 hours of the new iPhone 6S launch: Follow live

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Andrew Burton/Getty Images

For Apple fans, nothing is bigger than iPhone launch day.

Every year, lining up at stores for the new iPhone is a major event for the Apple faithful. And this year’s release of the iPhone 6S and iPhone 6S Plus is no exception.

But the mold has changed. While people still line up, an iPhone launch in 2015 looks a lot different than it did in 2007. Mashable will be reporting ’round the clock from Sydney, Singapore, London, New York City, San Francisco and Los Angeles to capture the glorious anticipation. Read more…

Sydney > Singapore > London > New York >
San Francisco > LA

More about Iphone, Apple, Apple Store, Marketing, and Tech


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5 Things You Must Do To Keep Some Dirtbag From Renting Out Your Crib While You’re Away on Vacay

While “John and Ed” were at Burning Man earlier this month, their paid house sitter (from TrustedHousesitters.com no less) listed their San Francisco pad on Airbnb. , this naturally prompts the question: what can I, as a person who leaves my home from time to time, do to prevent something similar, or worse, from happening to me? Here’s the answer.


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Following Google’s lead, telecoms and users can join in the fight against robocalls

robocalls

For the first time, Google joined the legal fight last week against robocalls.

It filed suit against a search engine optimization firm in California for robocalls that promised better results from its search engine. It also set up a new Web page for reporting robocall scams.

But even mighty Google can only do but so much to counter the epidemic of robocalls. Carriers can and should do more to combat them, according to Jan Volzke, vp of reputation services for identity management firm Whitepages.

From VentureBeat

Location, location, location — Not using geolocation to reach your mobile customers? Your competitors are. Find out what you’re missing.

We’re at “at a point where we have no trust in a phone call,” he told me in a recent conversation.

In case you’re one of the six people in the U.S. who haven’t encountered such “extremely urgent” robocalls, here’s one Googlized version that also touts Bing and Yahoo. (Although it’s of the same ilk, it’s not clear if this robocall is from the company Google is suing.)

But things could change. In early summer, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) strengthened carriers’ hand in combatting robocalls.

In a big breakthrough this past June, the FCC gave the carriers the green light to block unwanted calls. The carriers had asked the federal agency to decide if they could legally offer call-blocking, given their common carrier status and other issues. Under common carrier, all traffic needs to be handled in the same manner.

Yes, the agency said. You, the carriers, can block calls.

The FCC also gave consumers additional latitude in how they grant consent and in their ability to block calls. They said consent could be withdrawn at any time, consent is automatically removed if a landline or cell number gets assigned to someone else, and text messages count as robocalls.

Previously, Volzke pointed out, it was difficult to undo consent once you gave it, and “now all robocallers must allow you to get out of it.”

If there is any doubt you have opted out, the FCC clarified that later in the summer — the burden is on the robocalling business to show the user has opted in or that there is an existing business relationship.

Carriers now “need to get serious” about the fight, Volzke said.

As one example of their weak response, he said that carriers offer “these services for a ridiculous $ 4.99 a month to block up to ten [robocalling phone numbers], and then you have to renew it every 30 days.”

He’s not alone in his frustration. The attorneys-general of dozens of states have written to the carriers to take care of this.

But robocalls have not been declining since the FCC’s decision in June. In fact, Volzke said, the amount of mobile spam and robocalls that Whitepages blocks monthly is up about 40 percent since then.

He pointed to several remaining structural issues, such as the fact that unwanted calls can involve multiple carriers and the solution would best be industry-wide. And right now carriers can only block calls as the result of each subscriber’s request — that is, it’s still onesies.

So robocalling — even, probably, robocalling that drops Google’s name — is not going away anytime soon.

As we await the ultimate battle, Volzke offers a few tips:

  • The number one thing that affects the robocalls you get is the amount of consent you’ve given. In most cases, your phone number is the key to granting consent. So, treat your phone number with a level of confidentiality just below that of your Social Security number. He noted with amazement that people list their primary phone number on Facebook and Craigslist, where it can be scooped by a spider.
  • “Get a second phone number” for public postings, he advised, and be careful when you give your number to people or sites you don’t know. “No one reads all the fine print,” Volzke pointed out.
  • If you’re already on robocallers’ list, he suggests getting an app to filter the calls by originating phone number — assuming we’re talking about your smartphone and not your landline. (Not coincidentally, Whitepages offers a robocall- and robotext-blocking app for Android and iOS devices.)
  • Next step up is call blocking for a specific phone number, although the bad guys may well change their number after a while.
  • If that still doesn’t help, and you’re still getting multiple robocalls, Volzke said that getting a new phone number is “sometimes the only option.” That is, until the carriers get their act in gear.

By the way, Whitepages is an identity data company, not the phone book. They are involved in robocall issues because a) phone numbers are a key identifier, and b) they recently bought robocall blocker NumberCop.

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How Will Investors React To Apple’s iPhone 6s’ First Weekend Sales

Apple probably has to announce that it sold at least 12 million iPhone 6s’ were sold for the stock to move higher.


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Lengthening Procurement Timelines, Unfunded Mandates and Cultural…

New Deltek GovWin IQ report assesses the federal agency readiness and impact of IT acquisition reform initiatives

(PRWeb September 24, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/09/prweb12983353.htm

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2008: The Year that Drove Volkswagen Over The Ethical Cliff

The public has learned the “how” of Volkswagen’s deception involving the emissions of its “clean diesel” vehicles, but they are still asking the $ 18 billion question, why? The answer will probably unfold over the course of a televised congressional hearing, and the reasons will likely be numerous. But it’s clear that events in the years 2007 and 2008 were among the main impetuses.


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Former NASA Space Shuttle & Mars Rover Engineers Invent a Smart…

New game changing technology, easy to install “smart device” will double the hot water output of any water heater. For home owners this means no more cold showers and endless hot water for…

(PRWeb September 24, 2015)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/09/prweb12980737.htm

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Bring your company’s ‘dark data’ to light with this free new tool from Tamr

All the analytics tools in the world won’t do a company much good if it doesn’t know what data it has to analyze. Tamr offers a free, downloadable tool designed to help tackle that “dark data” problem.

Dark data generally refers to all the information an organization collects, processes and stores but doesn’t use for analytics or other purposes. It’s often unstructured or qualitative data that’s harder to keep track of than numerical data is, and by research firm IDC’s reckoning, it can account for as much as 90 percent of an organization’s information assets.

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The 20 Largest Companies in China 2015

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